The Remnants of a Life

I bought a desk this weekend. I had been needing one for some time. I work from home, and in addition to that, it would also be great to have a place carved out just for me to do my writing. A place where I can sit, in solitude and think or clear my mind. Focus on the words in my heart and put them on paper, or the internet, as the case may be. A creative space sectioned off from the rest of our home; like the sofa downstairs in front of the TV where I currently sit, feet up on the coffee table, laptop on my legs in our family room.

It’s not an office, per se, it’s also the guest room. And until last year it wasn’t even that. It was, in what turned out to be nothing more that vain hopefulness, (if such a thing exists) a pip-dream perhaps, our son’s room. A boy’s bulldog-brown painted twin bed, and matching dresser adorned the space where dinosaurs covered the bedding, curtains, and walls. After nearly three years of pouring out our heart and soul, not to mention time and money, into our pursuit of adoption it was time to face the fact that no son was to be called our own.

We simply couldn’t expend any more time, emotion, or energy to what had not only been a fruitless, but also psychiatrically draining endeavor. And I couldn’t look at that empty room a moment more. Out it all went, the day I decided to make it so, and a guest room, with a queen sized bed, night stand, and new décor replaced it immediately.

This weekend, I finally added a desk. And in doing so was able to clean out the old filing cabinet that now sat in the guestroom’s closet. A long overdue exercise in organization came about today as I went through the paperwork inside of it.

And there, tucked away inside the drawers were the remnants of a life. Mountains of paperwork I haven’t looked at in years. The new family resource packet from the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, the organization I now work for, that I realized only today, during my daughter’s illness, during her life I never even opened or looked at at all. Expandable file folders filled with medical information. Assessments, intake evaluations, and numerous other documentation relating to Miss Elliott’s diagnosis of Tay-Sachs disease, and care afterward. I found forms for orthotics, medically necessary seating and mobility information, recommendations for such, medication lists, notes from doctor visits, appointment cards, insurance statements, bill after bill for services rendered; neurology, genetics, feeding therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy…and on and on…

Paperwork

Why did I still have all of this? Why had we brought it with us when we moved? Why hadn’t I gone through it until now?

I guess I just hadn’t tackled it yet. Little by little. Not that long ago this was our life. These regimens were our routine; our known normal. It’s odd to realize how little our lives now resemble the one we were so accustomed to just a few short years ago. And it’s strange how these things, that all add up to medical fragility, immense care, time, and love, are now utterly meaningless. One thing you hear from families of medically fragile children is how that when their child is alive these things come to embody who they are, and once they are gone, they’re just a symbol of the disease, not the child. Nothing but a stack of papers exists, in physical form, as the remnants of our daughter’s life here on earth. And day by day the reminders of their being gone, the lack of a physical presence creeps in and take over our lives. Like the desk, or the guestroom, which would have been her room had she still been here with us.

But, out they went, that stacks of papers. We don’t need those remnants to be able to remember her, like some shrine to her physical being. She’s not there inside of those items anywhere. They may be tangible, but they’re meaningless. She exists in our hearts.

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