An Unlikely Hero

I first met Karen Ledsham in 2009, shortly after my Miss Elliott had been diagnosed with Tay-Sachs Disease.  We met through the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, online.  I lived in Seattle, and Karen lives in the U.K.  One of the great things that I learned about Karen was that she was sending her daughter Abigail’s doll, Pippy around the world to see the sights that Abigail had never gotten a chance to see.  Karen shipped Pippy to me and I took her to Boston in 2011 for the NTSAD’s Annual Family Conference.  By this time I had made a scrapbook for Pippy so everyone could chronicle their journey and send the memories back to Karen each time.  I was happy to have a chance to escort Pippy across the USA.

NTSAD 2011
Miss Elliott and I (front and center) with Pippy, and several of the families at the NTSAD Annual Family Conference, Boston, 2011.

Having survived the unthinkable, the death of her daughter, Karen would soon embark on a new and horrific journey in which her seemingly healthy son, her only other child, would soon be battling bone cancer.  Still standing today, Karen writes about her unlikely journey to becoming a hero to so many families facing child loss, as well as to those who haven’t.

“Everybody keeps telling me or, commenting on Facebook at how strong I am. They tell me how much they admire me, but I’m feeling very anxious and worried after twenty one months of time spent staying at home with my grief about going back to work in just two days’ time.

At least that’s what I’ve been telling people, but what I’m really feeling is sadness and guilt about carrying on with my life. I’m feeling sick to my stomach of having to walk through the same doors, to the same rooms, and see same people, all carrying on as if nothing has happened or changed when everything has happened and changed for me in my life. Everything.

I haven’t worked since that Friday evening back in April 2014 when the Accident and Emergency doctor told us our son, Harrison had a probable bone tumor. It turned out that he did in fact have bone cancer. He fought hard, but his battle was cut short just over a year later.

The cancer first took his leg, then his childhood, then his life. At the same time it took my life. The life that I had learned to live again after the unimaginable loss of our daughter, Abigail six years before to the genetic condition known as Sandhoff’s. Within the next year, I would also lose my mum. I didn’t know how I would survive those losses, but eventually life was going good again, we were all learning to survive and even enjoying life again. I had gone back to work four months after losing Abigail and although it was extremely difficult, as I’m a nurse, it was the right time and we carried on as best and as normal as we could because we had Harrison to think of. He needed a mum who was capable of caring for him and attending to his needs. I felt that in going back to work, it would help me stay focused and present in my life, and his. I didn’t feel as though I had a choice not to carry on.

Abigail and Harrison
Abigail and Harrison Ledsham

I was constantly frightened that something would happen to Harrison after Abigail was diagnosed and after she passed. I suppose I wrapped him in cotton wool. But at the same time wanted him to have a full and varied life, one she had missed out on. We put everything and all our time and energy into him.

After going back to work part time and under no circumstance would I work any extra hours. All my free time was precious, precious time to spend with Harrison and Paul. Colleagues used to question why I wouldn’t I work extra as Harrison was in school. My answer was always the same, I wanted time at home and to not be too tired or exhausted when he came home so I could give him my all. We let him take part in evening and weekend activities. If he wanted to do them, we did. He was busy with activities seven days a week. He was nearly a black belt in Karate, played rugby, golf, the French Horn, piano, had Spanish lessons with tutor, Boy Scouts, street dancing and drama. He enjoyed it all, but most of all we enjoyed seeing him happy and healthy and experiencing and embracing all the things life had to offer.

Now, after losing Harrison too, I find myself trying to move on, but the fact is I don’t want to move on without my children. I have no other children so I don’t really see the point like I did before. What other choice do I have? I could end it all now, and I have constantly had this thought, every day since he died. Even so this pain is so unbearable, I couldn’t do that to myself, to my family, to the memories of my children. So I know I need to take baby steps.

My going back to work is not about the money. We have our savings, and to be honest what do I need much money for now anyway? In many ways I feel that I can’t face nursing, looking after sick people, seeing death daily, doing the job I trained for and loved for so long, but what else can I do.

I made a decision that the Cancer wasn’t taking my career so I’m just going to be working one day a week, doing none clinical job and going to see how I get on. It will be nice to see everyone again but I can’t say I’m looking forward to it. I’m not looking forward to not being with Paul, my husband during my hours at work. We haven’t spent much time apart in nearly two years and I’m feeling worried about that too. Paul isn’t working either yet. After he took his leave to be with Harrison, his company was bought out and moved to another location. All two-hundred plus employees were let go. Now, after 25 years of service, where does he go from here? He doesn’t have the energy to start over somewhere new.

We’re not sure who we are anymore. So much of what we spent our lives building is gone. So much of what defined who we are doesn’t exist anymore, but every day I wake up, and here I am. I didn’t ask for this, I don’t want to be strong, I don’t want to be an inspiration. I just want to be a mum. Although so many people look at me as a hero for what I’ve endured, my heroes will always be Abigail and Harrison.”

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3 thoughts on “An Unlikely Hero

  1. Isabelle

    While I’ve never lost any child of my own, I can understand what you’re saying. Being a homeschool mother of 3, I have given a big portion of my life to my children. I love them as any mother does. But my day seems to revolve around them

    Reply
  2. Isabelle

    …the majority of my day seems to revolve around them. If I were to lose any or all of them, I would feel completely lost. I wouldn’t know what to do with myself. I can’t even understand how it’s possible to keep going and to give meaning to your life again. It must be unbelievably hard. I will pray for you. While this is a time of grieving, it’s also a time to reinvent yourself. I pray that God will light your way during these difficult and dark days.

    Reply
  3. Rebecca

    I have seen post about Karen in the NTSAD group and my heart just breaks for her. Since I have just lost my youngest, my other children are absolutely my motivation for getting up every day and it is impossible to imagine not having them. I am learning how to live with grief and I worry constantly about something happening to my other two. The death of my baby taught me we can’t always protect our children, to always show them you love them, and to live every day to the fullest but it is still hard not to want to bubble wrap them. Karen’s story encourages me and reminds me to let my children live and to make sure they know how much they are loved because there are still no guarantees for tomorrow. My deepest heart felt sympathies to Karen and gratitude for sharing her story.

    Reply

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